Sound Waves: Pitch Depends on the Size of an Instrument

Blow or tap a series of bottles with different amounts of water to see how the size of a vibrating object compares to the pitch it makes. Kids are fascinated to see that the same bottle produces different pitches when it's blown versus tapped. Kids gain first-hand knowledge of this concept: that more massive objects make lower pitches.

 

What's Included:

✅ Instructions written directly to the student
✅ Student Sheet for capturing observations
✅ Answer Key to Student Sheet
✅ Teacher Notes with prep, set up, and explanations.

 

This Resource Is Great For:

❑ Whole class activity
❑ Group work
❑ Station work

 

Questions Answered:

☀ How does the amount of water in a bottle affect the pitch it makes when it is struck?
☀ How does the amount of water in a bottle affect the pitch it makes when it is blown?

 

Topics & Concepts Addressed:

✦ The more water in a bottle, the lower the pitch it will make when struck.
✦ The less water in a bottle, the higher the pitch it will make when struck.
✦ The more water in a bottle, the higher the pitch it will make when blown.

 

Materials Needed

Glass bottles, water, pencil (for striking)

 

Preparation Needed

gather materials

Sound Waves: Pitch Depends on the Size of an Instrument

$3.00Price

    Answer Keys and Teacher Notes address most questions and issues that might arise in this study—you shouldn’t have to do any outside research unless you want to.

    Connect with me: If you have questions or problems, please let me know and I’ll get back to you as soon as I can.

     

    This resource (along with all resources sold on this site) can be found inside the membership. For information on that option, click here.

    Terms of Use   Copyright © Carolyn Balch. All rights reserved by the author. This product is to be used by the original downloader only. Copying for more than one teacher, classroom, department, school, or school system is prohibited. This product may not be distributed or displayed digitally for public view. Failure to comply is a copyright infringement and a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Clipart and elements found in this PDF are copyrighted and cannot be extracted and used outside of this file without permission or license. Intended for classroom and personal use ONLY.